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How to help your partner deal with depression

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It can be hard to be in a relationship with someone with depression. Also, depression can make someone more irritable, angry, or withdrawn. The symptoms of depression may lead to more arguments, frustration, or feelings of alienation. Although depression can be challenging, most people want to do what they can to help. If your partner has depression, here are some ways you can help her through it and maybe even strengthen your relationship in the process. First and foremost, be patient.

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How to Help Your Partner Through Their Depression

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When your partner is depressed, it can feel like your world is falling apart. You may struggle to understand why the person you love is suddenly different, and you likely want to know what brought this drastic change on and how to fix it. During an episode of depression you may feel helpless, overwhelmed, and in pain. Your partner may withdraw from you or feel like a burden. However, depression does not mean that your relationship is broken. Your relationship can improve. When you are dealing with a partner with depression, you first need to take care of yourself.

Caring for someone who is struggling takes every ounce of your strength and you need to feel that you have enough resources before you can offer any to them. Gathering up your resources and rallying your support system is essential to feeling like you can get through this.

This might mean scheduling weekly phone calls with someone you trust, seeing a therapist yourself, or joining a support group. During hard moments, remind yourself that it requires courage to face depression head on and to choose to love your partner during their struggle. Allow yourself to reflect on your incredible capacity for love and care. Find Outlets — Engagement is the enemy of depression.

Make plans that you can look forward to, celebrate accomplishments, and savor your connections. This is not to say that you should use activities to distance yourself from your partner, but you are allowed to be active and explore new possibilities even if your partner is not able to join you at that moment. Focus On Love — When the going gets tough remind yourself of all the things that you love about your partner.

If your partner feels up for it, this might be a conversation to have with them. Trade memories of good times back and forth or make a list of your top 10 favorite things about them. Recall an especially good memory and linger with it for an extended period of time, letting it really sink in.

Deepening these thoughts will help counterbalance the weight of your shared experience of depression. This is not necessarily a bad thing! You can grow stronger and closer in your efforts to manage depression and help your partner cope. You love your partner and want them to feel better.

Depression is a slippery slope, and sometimes your best intentions can actually make the situation worse. Here are some guidelines to consider when trying to help your partner through their depression. Educate Yourself — Depression is a mental illness that can be triggered by life events, biological changes, and genetic predisposition.

The symptoms of depression include sad mood, low energy, irritability, social isolation, trouble focusing or accomplishing goals, changes in eating and sleeping, and hopelessness. Doing research and learning about the effects of depression can help you feel more prepared to handle it. Encourage Treatment — Talk therapy, medication, and support groups are all helpful in dealing with depression. Your partner can learn skills that will help them be more engaged and less isolated.

Through therapy and other treatment they may find improvements in their mood and recognize that they are not alone in their struggle. Therapy can also teach your partner that they are not "broken" and help them towards greater self-acceptance. Telling your partner about all the great things in their life as examples of reasons to not be depressed will not help them and will likely make them feel worse. If your partner asks, feel free to offer advice or give an alternative perspective to a problem.

Keep in mind that your partner will not always be able to absorb your help, though. Sometimes depression feels especially dark and hard to escape from, so your partner may have trouble seeing the things that you are hopeful about.

This is not a failing on their part, or yours. It is part of depression, and your partner will appreciate it if you keep offering help. Your persistence in the belief that they will persevere can inspire much-needed hope. If you -- or someone you know -- need help, please call for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. If you are outside of the U. News U. HuffPost Personal Video Horoscopes. Newsletters Coupons. Follow Us. Part of HuffPost Wellness. All rights reserved.

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How to help a depressed spouse

When one spouse has depression, it can put a strain on a marriage. Living with a depressed partner who is often unhappy, critical and negative isn't easy, and at the same time, it may also be hard to persuade a husband or wife to get help. Jay Baer, a psychiatrist and director of ambulatory services in the department of psychiatry at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Depression results from shifts in brain chemistry that influence mood, thoughts, sex drive, sleep, appetite and energy levels — all factors that could affect a marriage, as well as disrupt home and family life. You bet," Baer said.

When you're in a relationship, whatever your partner deals with, you deal with. And vice versa. So if your partner is depressed , it's imperative that you know how to handle it in a healthy, helpful, and supportive way — for the sake of each partner's mental health.

I suffer from depression myself and I know how tough it can be. But I want to talk to the partners - the people living with the people who are living with depression. It can make them say and do things that you just don't understand. I spent three years talking to more than people about their experiences with love, sex, and depression for my book, The Monster Under The Bed. These are their tips.

How to cope when your partner has depression

To the outside world, Emme lived a charmed life. She was a successful model, creative director of her own clothing line, a television host, lecturer, and mother of a beautiful baby girl. Phillip Aronson, the wonderful man she married, found himself in a downward spiral of depression, even attempting suicide at one point to escape his pain. Phil was always an energetic partner, excited to go to work each morning either to the showroom to check on the latest graphic designs for the Emme line or to attend meetings about some new project. He was a caring and loving father. I never felt more alone. However, many experts feel these statistics are simply wrong. Depressed women on the other hand may blame themselves, but then they ask their doctor for help.

9 Tips for Helping a Partner with Depression

Understanding how depression affects your partner can be key to building a healthy, supportive relationship that cares for the mental wellbeing of both partners. Depression can cause people to withdraw, behave differently or become more irritable. Common symptoms include insomnia, feelings of worthlessness and loss of interest in activities. It can even lead to physical aches and pains. Living with depression for a longer period of time can take a toll on your partner's levels of energy, motivation and passion.

Standing on the sidelines when a partner battles depression can feel like a helpless experience.

When your spouse has depression , you might be very worried, and feel utterly helpless. After all, depression is a stubborn, difficult illness. Your partner might seem detached or deeply sad.

5 Ways to Offer Support When Your Spouse Is Depressed

Depression is tough on a relationship. A psychologist explains how to help a depressed spouse, signs of depression and how to strengthen your relationship. Clinical psychologist Adam Borland, PsyD , shares how you can help a depressed spouse — and yourself — so you can get through the tough times, together. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center.

When your partner is depressed, it can feel like your world is falling apart. You may struggle to understand why the person you love is suddenly different, and you likely want to know what brought this drastic change on and how to fix it. During an episode of depression you may feel helpless, overwhelmed, and in pain. Your partner may withdraw from you or feel like a burden. However, depression does not mean that your relationship is broken.

Tips for Coping With Depression in a Relationship

No one teaches us how to navigate a relationship when mental illness or depression enters the equation. I recently read a Washington Post article by a woman whose relationship was torn apart while she and her partner tried to deal with his depression. Last year when I plunged into a depressive episode during our relationship, my partner was at a loss. He had never dealt with this and wanted so badly to help, but had no idea what to do. Sure we hit bumps along the road, but in the end I felt loved, supported, and understood in a way I never had before during a depressive episode, and he felt like he knew what was going on—a big deal in this situation—and was equipped to deal with it. It operates on the notion that the not-depressed partner is wonderful and selfless for standing by the partner with depression.

Jun 3, - Phillip Aronson, the wonderful man she married, found himself in a downward spiral of depression, even attempting suicide at one point to.

As men, we like to think of ourselves as strong and in control of our emotions. When we feel hopeless or overwhelmed by despair we often deny it or try to cover it up. But depression is a common problem that affects many of us at some point in our lives, not a sign of emotional weakness or a failing of masculinity.

8 Tips for Dealing with a Depressed Spouse

If you are in a relationship with someone who has depression, you are likely struggling with a mix of emotions and hosts of questions. What's it really like to feel depressed? What can you do to help them through hard times? How will their symptoms and treatment impact your relationship?

10 Ways To Cope With Your Partner’s Depression

Try these: time management relationship advice healthy lifestyle money wealth success leadership psychology. When you married your partner, you agreed to love and support them for better or for worse, through sickness and in health. Though you may have found it easy to maintain your connection when you were both in a good mental space, your vows are tested when one of you experiences emotional issues.

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When Depressed Husbands Refuse Help

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Comments: 3
  1. Mugore

    I congratulate, an excellent idea

  2. Tolkis

    Rather excellent idea

  3. Faezshura

    I congratulate, very good idea

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