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Where does hector find his wife andromache

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He acted as leader of the Trojans and their allies in the defence of Troy, "killing 31, Greek fighters. Hector's name could thus be taken to mean 'holding fast'. He was married to Andromache , with whom he had an infant son, Scamandrius whom the people of Troy called Astyanax. During the European Middle Ages, Hector figures as one of the Nine Worthies noted by Jacques de Longuyon , known not only for his courage but also for his noble and courtly nature. Indeed, Homer places Hector as peace-loving, thoughtful as well as bold, a good son, husband and father, and without darker motives. James Redfield describes Hector as a "martyr to loyalties, a witness to the things of this world, a hero ready to die for the precious imperfections of ordinary life.

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Homer’s Iliad Book 6: Hector’s farewell

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The battle continues, and although the gods are no longer taking part, the Achaians drive back the Trojans. There is much slaughter, and in their ardor to defeat the Trojans, the Achaians do not even pause to collect loot. The Trojan force is in full retreat when Helenos, a soothsayer, suggests that his brother Hektor return to Troy and arrange for the queen and the other royal women of the city to make an offering in the temple of Athena in hopes of placating the goddess.

Hektor agrees to the wisdom of this plan, and while he goes back to Troy, there is a short lull in the fighting. During this interval, Agamemnon orders Menelaos to kill Adrestus even though Menelaos' intends to spare the Trojan. Diomedes and Glaukos step into the area between the two resting armies and challenge each other to personal combat.

They discover, however, while explaining their individual pedigrees, that there were once ties of friendship between their grandfathers; thus, according to the heroic code, they must maintain these same bonds of friendship. They promise to avoid fighting each other in the battles to come, and, as a token of their fellowship, they trade armor.

Diomedes comes out ahead in this exchange because his bronze armor is worth only nine oxen, while the golden armor of Glaukos is worth one hundred oxen, but the two men part as comrades. In Troy, Hektor instructs his mother, Hekuba, about the rites to be held in Athena's temple, and then he goes to find Paris, who has been absent from the battlefield.

He discovers his brother at home with Helen and her handmaidens, and he sternly rebukes him for his irresponsibility. Paris admits that he has been disgracing himself, and he prepares himself to join the fight.

Hektor, meanwhile, goes to visit his own wife and baby son. He finds Andromache and the baby Astyanax on the walls overlooking the battlefield. Andromache pleads with Hektor not to endanger himself any longer. Achilles has killed her father and all her brothers, and now Hektor is her whole family; she begs him to have pity on her and their infant child.

Hektor admits his concern for Andromache, but he says that he must consider his reputation and his duty. In his heart, he says, he knows that Troy will fall someday, but he is, after all, foremost a soldier and a prince, and he has many responsibilities. He adds that he often worries about the fate of his dear wife and son after he is dead and his city has been captured, but that a mortal cannot change the will of the gods.

After saying this, Hektor kisses Andromache and Astyanax and leaves. Paris joins him at the city gate, and they both return to the battlefield. In the overall structure of the epic, this fighting involves three large movements between the ships and the city. Within Book VI a distinctive movement from cold-heartedness to tenderness, from barbarity to honor occurs.

Agamemnon's brutality is immediately contrasted with the kinship discovered by Glaukos and Diomedes. The two warriors discover that they have ties because of their forebears. They not only pledge friendship but exchange armor as well. The exchange of armor is especially significant because armor was associated with identity, and the exchange is a symbolic exchange of character.

In this example, Homer shows that war can entail more than carnage, and that bonds of friendship can be established. An interesting sideline in this scene is Glaukos' mention of symbols inscribed "on a folded tablet.

But Homer goes on to show even greater humanity in wartime. As Hektor returns to Troy, he first meets the wives of the Trojan warriors, reminding the reader that for each soldier there is an individual life and story within the city.

Likewise, when Hektor sees his mother, Hekuba, their meeting, too, is a reminder of the ties of kinship and love that implicitly exist for every character in the story. Moreover, these ties of love and kinship have all become disconnected by the war. The scenes in Book VI graphically remind the reader why the Greek soldiers rushed to their ships to return home in Book II when they were offered the opportunity to return home.

Before Hektor is reunited with Andromache, he encounters Paris and Helen. Hektor's anger toward Paris is palpable. Paris and Helen are the causes of the war that men such as Hektor and the husbands of the Trojan wives are fighting, while Paris himself lies in bed with Helen. The contrast between the responsible Hektor and the irresponsible Paris is obvious.

This contrast is carried further when Helen makes an oblique pass at Hektor. Hektor tactfully rebuffs her, saying, "Don't ask me to sit beside you here, Helen. Once again, the contrast with Paris is clear. Most commentators consider this scene to be the most moving in the Iliad. It is a portrait of the warrior at home, war forgotten as he watches his son play and talks with his wife. Hektor's family becomes a symbol for all the soldier's families, what their lives could be if there were no war.

Once again, Hektor is the perfect contrast to Achilles. As Hektor stands in the loving circle of his home and family, Achilles, alienated and alone, rages in his tent. Achilles is more dangerous, but Hektor is more human. In fact, with Hector and Achilles, Homer provides two different paradigms.

Both are great warriors, both are destined to die; and yet they represent entirely different value systems. Achilles is the warrior; Hektor the family man. Achilles embodies the values of the individual who fights only for glory and honor; Hektor symbolizes the larger concerns of friends, of family, of home and civilization itself. However, Homer makes it clear that both Hektor and Achilles are alike in one respect — they will fight and die for honor over all else. Home, family, peace — all mean everything to Hektor, yet he will return to the battle, knowing he will be killed, because honor demands it.

Even Paris is roused to leave Helen when his honor is challenged. Similarly, Achilles goes into battle later, knowing he too will die, but feeling that honor requires his presence. Hektor and Achilles are worthy counterparts with different values in most respects, but ultimately alike in their deepest motivations.

In the end though, both subscribe to the code that the ultimate honor for a hero is to die in battle. Much of the boasting in battle is a type of bravado.

Chimaera a monster with a lion's head, a snake's tail, and a goat's body, killed by Bellerophon. Both the distaff and loom are associated with women in the Iliad. Maenad a female votary of Dionysus who took part in the wild, orgiastic rites that characterized his worship; bacchante. Previous Book V. Next Book VII. Removing book from your Reading List will also remove any bookmarked pages associated with this title.

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Andromache

The battle continues, and although the gods are no longer taking part, the Achaians drive back the Trojans. There is much slaughter, and in their ardor to defeat the Trojans, the Achaians do not even pause to collect loot. The Trojan force is in full retreat when Helenos, a soothsayer, suggests that his brother Hektor return to Troy and arrange for the queen and the other royal women of the city to make an offering in the temple of Athena in hopes of placating the goddess. Hektor agrees to the wisdom of this plan, and while he goes back to Troy, there is a short lull in the fighting. During this interval, Agamemnon orders Menelaos to kill Adrestus even though Menelaos' intends to spare the Trojan.

All her relations perished when Troy was taken by Achilles. When the captives were allotted, Andromache fell to Neoptolemus , the son of Achilles, whom she accompanied to Epirus and to whom she bore three sons.

Here is one of the most poignant and tragic scenes at least in its outcome, foretold but unstated here in all of epic poetry. Andromache in Captivity, by Frederic Leighton. But may I be dead and the piled earth hide me under before I hear you crying and know by this that they drag you captive. Then his beloved father laughed out, and his honoured mother, and at once glorious Hector lifted from his head the helmet and laid it in all its shining upon the ground.

Astyanax , in Greek legend , prince who was the son of the Trojan prince Hector and his wife Andromache. Hector named him Scamandrius after the River Scamander, near Troy. After the fall of Troy, Astyanax was hurled from the battlements of the city by either Odysseus or the Greek warrior—and son of Achilles—Neoptolemus. His death is described in the last epics of the so-called epic cycle a collection of post-Homeric Greek poetry , The Little Iliad and The Sack of Troy. According to medieval legend , however, he survived the war, established the kingdom of Messina in Sicily , and founded the line that led to Charlemagne. Info Print Cite. Submit Feedback.

Hector speaks to his wife and child after returning from battle and although he does not know it yet, it is to be their last meeting before he is killed by Achilles. It is a memorable moment, in which Hector displays a heart-breaking affection for his wife and son, alongside a tragic understanding that he will ultimately be unable to protect them. For with Hector gone she and her son will be alone in this world. Hector however is a hero in a warrior society and to stay behind the battle would mean disgrace for himself and his family.

Hector goes to see his wife and son.

Find out more. See Important Quotations Explained. As the battle rages, Pandarus wounds the Achaean hero Diomedes. Diomedes prays to Athena for revenge, and the goddess endows him with superhuman strength and the extraordinary power to discern gods on the field of battle.

Ancient Greek Beliefs. Perry L. A massive page descriptive and analytical history of Hellenic myths, folklore, religious beliefs and practices, "Ancient Greek Beliefs" by Perry L. Westmoreland is a comprehensive, impressively researched, superbly organized and written body of work which is divided into three major sections: Greek Mythology, The Ancient Greeks; and Conclusions.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: [Troy/TFOAC] Hector & Andromache » A Marriage of Love

She was born and raised in the city of Cilician Thebe , over which her father ruled. During the Trojan War , after Hector was killed by Achilles and the city taken by the Greeks, the Greek herald Talthybius informed her of the plan to kill Astyanax , her son by Hector, by throwing him from the city walls. This act was carried out by Neoptolemus who then took Andromache as a concubine and Hector's brother, Helenus , as a slave. By Neoptolemus, she was the mother of Molossus , and according to Pausanias , [2] of Pielus and Pergamus. Pausanias also implies that Helenus' son, Cestrinus , was by Andromache.

The Trojans and Achaeans are fighting and a lot of guys with funny names killed a lot of other guys with funny names. Menelaus is about to kill him but he begged for his life, claiming that his father is rich and will offer a large ransom if he knew his son was alive among the Achaeans. Menelaus agrees and gives him to a squire to take to his ship. Then Agamemnon tells Menelaus not to spare a single Trojan and that they should all killed. Menelaus is persuaded by his brother and stabs Adrestus on his side, killing him.

like a woman, since I would have stripped off my armor. Nor is there any way from an find hardest to do. Hector goes to his own home to look for snp5000.com T VAN NORTWICK - ‎ - ‎Cited by 26 - ‎Related articles.

Favorite Greek Myths. Bob Blaisdell. The Greek myths have intrigued countless generations of readers with their exciting tales of adventure, calamity, and conquest. This entertaining collection — excellently retold for young audiences by Bob Blaisdell — invites children to relive the memorable experiences of familiar characters from Greek mythology. Taken directly from the writings of Homer, Hesiod, Sophocles, Aeschylus, Euripides, and other ancient storytellers, the myths recount the stirring and imaginative tales of Pandora's box, Prometheus, the dreaded Cyclops, the labors of the mighty Hercules, the captivating stories of Narcissus and Echo, Aphrodite and Eros, Daedalus and Icarus, Hades and Persephone, and many more.

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Comments: 1
  1. Tejind

    It to it will not pass for nothing.

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