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Why can you not look at the sun during a solar eclipse

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Looking at a solar eclipse is dangerous for the eyes. It can cause a condition called solar retinopathy , which is when solar radiation damages the eyes. It can even lead to permanent blind spots or distortions in your vision. Learn More. This damage occurs when people underestimate the sun, thinking that an eclipse blocks enough of its light for it to be safe to look at.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How to view a solar eclipse without damaging your eyes

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Solar retinopathy: Why you shouldn't stare at the sun, even during a solar eclipse - TomoNews

Why is it dangerous to look at the solar eclipse directly specially at that moment?

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People across the United States will have the chance to see a total solar eclipse on Aug. While it may be tempting to brush off warnings about looking up at this eclipse bare-eyed, don't: The light of an eclipse really can damage your eyes — though warnings of total blindness may be overstated.

The retina is home to the light-sensing cells that make vision possible. When they're over-stimulated by sunlight, they release a flood of communication chemicals that can damage the retina. This damage is often painless, so people don't realize what they're doing to their vision. Solar retinopathy can be caused by staring at the sun regardless of its phase , but few people can stand to look directly at our nearest star for very long without pain. It does happen occasionally — medical journals record cases in which people high on drugs have stared at the sun for long periods of time, causing serious damage.

Adherents of sun-worshipping religious sects are also victims. In , for example, Italian ophthalmologists treated 66 people for solar retinopathy after a sun-staring ritual. With the sun almost covered, it's comfortable to stare, and protective reflexes like blinking and pupil contraction are a lot less likely to kick in than on a normal day.

Even pets are vulnerable to eye damage from looking at an eclipse, though they don't tend to look directly at the sun. Even so, if they're with you during your eclipse outing, your furry friends should wear protective glasses as well. Early observers of astronomy sometimes found out about solar retinopathy the hard way. Thomas Harriot, who observed sunspots in but did not publish his discovery, wrote in that after viewing the sun his "sight was dim for an hour.

Scientists don't have a good bead on the prevalence of eye damage after a solar eclipse. In one study, conducted in after a solar eclipse visible in Europe, 45 patients with possible solar retinopathy showed up at an eye clinic in Leicester in the United Kingdom after viewing the eclipse.

Forty were confirmed to have some sort of damage or symptoms of damage; five of those had visible changes in their retina. Twenty of the patients reported eye pain, while another 20 reported problems with vision. Of the latter group, 12 reported that their sight had returned to normal seven months later, but four could still see the ghosts of the damage in their visual field, such as a crescent-shaped spot visible in dim light.

However, they warned, earlier post-eclipse studies had turned up more severe problems in patients, suggesting that widespread media warnings not to look at the eclipsing sun may have prevented more damage during recent eclipses.

Research also suggests that while a lot of the damage may heal, some may be permanent. One study followed 58 patients who sustained eye damage after viewing a eclipse in Turkey. Healing occurred during the first month after the eclipse, the researchers reported in the journal Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, but by 18 months, whatever damage remained was permanent up to 15 years later.

So, while it might be tough to go totally blind by looking at an eclipse, doing so without proper protection could leave a long-lasting stain on your vision. Originally published on Live Science. Live Science. Please deactivate your ad blocker in order to see our subscription offer. A tourist watches a solar eclipse through eclipse-viewing glasses in in Varanasi, India.

What happens if you look at the solar eclipse without the special glasses?

We are all very excited whenever there is an announcement for a solar eclipse. It is usually breaking news. From television stations to radio outlets and cyber platforms, it is all over. News of solar eclipses spread, with people looking forward to viewing them.

People across the United States will have the chance to see a total solar eclipse on Aug. While it may be tempting to brush off warnings about looking up at this eclipse bare-eyed, don't: The light of an eclipse really can damage your eyes — though warnings of total blindness may be overstated. The retina is home to the light-sensing cells that make vision possible.

You've probably heard that staring at the sun is bad for your eyes. Well, you've heard right, because people who stare at the sun can go blind. When you were a kid, you may have performed the trick where you lit paper on fire using the sun and a magnifying glass. The light of the sun is so strong that if you concentrate it with a lens, you can actually start a fire. If you stare at the sun, this lens concentrates a spot of sunlight on your retina, and it burns it too.

What if I looked straight at an eclipse of the sun?

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the earth, and the moon fully or partially obscures the sun. It is extremely dangerous to look directly at the sun even during a solar eclipse. You should never attempt to observe a total, partial or annular eclipse with the naked eye. The safest technique for viewing a solar eclipse is indirect viewing. For example you can easily project an image of the sun onto a screen or you can view live streams on TV or online. Children's eyes in particular are extremely delicate and transmit more light through to the retina. The use of eyewear marketed as 'eclipse glasses' has become more popular. Safe use of these glasses relies on the filtering ability of the lenses and the design of the frames.

Solar eclipse and health

A truly awe-inspiring event, a solar eclipse is when the moon blocks any part of the sun from our view. The bright face of the sun is covered gradually by the moon during a partial eclipse, lasting a few hours. During the brief period of a total eclipse when the moon fully covers the sun only a couple of minutes , the light of day gives way to a deep twilight sky. Bright stars and planets become more visible in the sky.

A solar eclipse occurs when a portion of the Earth is engulfed in a shadow cast by the Moon which fully or partially blocks sunlight. This occurs when the Sun , Moon and Earth are aligned.

By Anne Buckle and Aparna Kher. Never look directly at the Sun. You can seriously hurt your eyes, and even go blind.

What Happens to Your Eyes If You Look Directly at the Sun During a Solar Eclipse?

You can also watch with our free Android and iOS app! Be sure to prepare for viewing solar eclipses live: use these tips and techniques to get a clear view without injuring your eyes. This is probably the most important part of this website.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: I LOOKED UP AT THE SOLAR ECLIPSE!!!! EXTREMELY DANGEROUS!!* I Went Blind*

Like a camera lens, your pupils dilate, or open, in darkness to allow in more light. In Boston on Aug. But if you look at the partial eclipse, the portion of the sun that is visible can cause permanent damage to your eyes. The damage can be temporary or permanent and occurs with no pain. It can take a few hours to a few days after viewing the solar eclipse to realize the damage that has occurred.

Solar eclipse

F or the first time in U. ET on Monday. But those who watch this rare celestial event in person need to take precautions, because staring right at the sun can quickly harm your eyes. The path of totality, which is about 70 miles wide, is viewable from parts of 14 states, as shown on this solar eclipse map , and only lasts a maximum of two minutes and 40 seconds, according to NASA. Before and after the total solar eclipse, those in its path will see a partial eclipse, in which the moon only partly blocks the sun.

Aug 10, - REMEMBER not to stare directly at the sun without protective eyewear during the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse. If you don't have certified eclipse.

A total solar eclipse is one of the most awe-inspiring events in nature, but astronomers and ophthalmologists warn that looking at the sun without solar eclipse glasses or other protection can damage your eyes and cause permanent blindness. Totality, the brief period when the moon completely covers the sun, is the only safe time to watch with the naked eye. Lasting from seconds to a maximum of 7. The sun is basically a huge, continuous thermonuclear explosion, which produces intense radiation across the spectrum from infrared to ultraviolet light and beyond.

Is Looking At A Solar Eclipse Worse Than Looking At The Sun?

Let she who has never ignored the risks and eaten raw cookie dough cast the first stone. But this is a time to listen. Do not use your typical sunglasses.

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Comments: 2
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